[The Lost Books of The Odyssey] E–pub ¸ Zachary Mason

  • Hardcover
  • 228
  • The Lost Books of The Odyssey
  • Zachary Mason
  • English
  • 06 October 2020
  • 9780374192150

Zachary Mason Î 6 Download

Zachary Mason Î 6 Download The Lost Books of The Odyssey Read ☆ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB A BRILLIANT AND BEGUILING REIMAGINING OF ONE OF OUR GREATEST MYTHS BY A GIFTED YOUNG WRITERZachary Mason’s brilliant and beguiling debut novel The Lost Books of the Odyssey reimagines Homer’s classic story of the hero Odysseus a. A beautifully uirky reimagination of Odyssey along multiple lines of parallel thought diaphanous worlds choice happenstances clever entanglements of fate and wit human and otherwise Well if it isn t the geekiest take on Odysseus s adventures I seriously enjoyed Odysseus and Athena in this one He called together his wisest men Nestor Palamedes and wily Odysseus and commissioned them to write for him a book that clearly and explicitly explained everything under the sun even unto all the mysteries hidden within the earth the true names of every living thing the number of grains of sand on the Troad the secret histories of the gods and the tumultuous futures of the stars all to be writ fair in no and no less than a thousand pages The counselors conferred in low voices out of the king s hearing speaking of the state of the king s mind and vanity the innate interest of the task whether the taskmaster would be able to recognize a solution c Sounds like the story of modern consulting developmentIt had been impossible to fit this wealth of knowledge into a mere thousand pages even with letters no larger than a grain of the ubiuitous white sand so the sages had made the book read differently and coherently forward and backward from bottom to top and top to bottom if every other word was skipped and if every third letter was ignored and so on c Fat load of fun it must have been Both reading and creating such a monstrosityHe had spent the days of his exile imagining different homecoming scenarios but it had never occurred to him that she would just give up Such a long trip he thinks and so many places I could have stayed along the way cIn the Imperial Court of Agamemnon the serene the lofty the disingenuous the elect of every corner of the empire there were three viziers ten consuls twenty generals thirty admirals fifty hierophants a hundred assassins eight hundred administrators of the second degree two thousand administrators of the third and clerks soldiers courtesans scholars painters musicians beggars larcenists arsonists stranglers sycophants and hangers on of no particular description beyond all number all poised to do the bright the serene the etc emperor s will cAgamemnon called for the clerk of Suicides Temple Offerings Investitures Bankruptcy and Humane and Just Liuidation and signed Odysseus s death warrant The clerk of Suicides etc bowed and with due formality passed the document to the General who Holds Death in His Right Hand who annotated it stamped it and passed it to the Viceroy of Domestic Matters Involving Mortality and so on through the many twists and turns of the bureaucracy through the hands of spy masters career criminals blind assassins mendacious clerics and finally to the lower ranks of advisors who had been promoted to responsibility for their dedication and competence rare ualities given their low wages and the contempt with which they were treated by their well connected or nobly born superiors one of whom noted it was a death order of high priority and without reading it assigned it to that master of battle and freuent servant of the throne Odysseus cBut in fact there was no warning and I had no dreams waking before dawn to a morning like every other morning on the long shore of Troy alone in my tent the smell of wood smoke the light of false dawn the silhouettes of passing soldiers on the canvas wall cOdysseus the wanderer the elouent the silver tongued walked along wooded paths over high sea cliffs affording glimpses of the harbor the distant city and the shining white capped waves the sort of place of which a man lost in mazy sea ways and the malice of petty gods might dream cAmong the Phaeacians it is believed that each man lives out his life as a character in a story told by someone else When his story ends a Phaeacian does not die but goes on to play another role in a different story told by the same teller In this way the changes of station endemic to Phaeacian life are explained cAs long as he is remote a distant voice an abstraction you are the master of your life and lands and all things are possible to you But once you have seen his face and taken his measure then the endless possibilities always an illusion will dissolve and your life will be revealed as the poor invention of a limited mind rarely inspired cEveryone in that city has a royal ancestor no less than four generations back and considers himself a prince biding his time likewise everyone has a great aunt or great uncle who must be confined in an attic cIf you welcome death you are gently mad cunimportant Even with the sweetness of the evening the harbor full of my ships the firelight in the palace windows I would have lived enough would have understood my life s shape if I could meet the teller and know him cFor this reason the Phaeacians consider silence an act of kindness as sacred as guest friendship a grant of repose to a distant stranger cWhen opened the book released a waft like hot iron in a winter forge cThe mathematics underlying the populations of herring in the sea the evolution of the stars and the fencing style of a certain little known sect of Sicilian masters and how these disparate things are secretly ruled by a single idea cI wanted a book that gave me some understanding not this cabinet of wonders and analogies this encyclopedia of encyclopedias tricked into a millennium of pages ctatterdemalion cHis style was uninformed by tactics or conseuences cI did not wish to number myself among the sacrifices and therefore became a skilled tactician anticipating the places where the Trojans would attack and being elsewhere Cultivating him was easy as the other chiefs found him stand offish and abstemious and he had few friends cI uestioned the value of an immortality that lasted exactly until one died but his fatalism was impregnable and he laughed at me and called me a sophist cThis was five years into the war Any sane man would have called it a loss or perhaps found some way to construe it as a victory and gone home chis mind was full of dead suns ancient cities made of ice cold still things uiet and thoughtful on the edge of slipping into nothing Of falling forever cIn the eighteenth century BC there was a thriving cult of the goddess uickness known for virginity uick thinking harsh laughter and an association with owls cThere is no action under the sun that does not entail myriad effects all of which leave signs and from this chain of signs all previous actions can be inferred I fancied myself a philosopher although for the most part my philosophizing consisted of staring out to sea usually with a fishing pole in my hand thinking of nothing The sun would bore into my brain over the hours and drive out everything except a ringing brightness making everything look hollow or flat we are revealed in our lies cShe thought of fleeing but knew from the fall of the city wall s shadow from the voice of the wind sighing through the towers and from the shapes of the bright clouds overhead always changing that it would not be so that her fate was elsewhere that for once the god had lied Like me you have the knack of stringing victory together out of whatever is at hand cIt is a shame that the way of the Olympians is to help their prot g s help themselves cwanton termagant sorceress wife cOdysseus returned and so shall I c

Summary The Lost Books of The Odyssey

The Lost Books of The Odyssey

Zachary Mason Î 6 Download The Lost Books of The Odyssey Read ☆ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Classic Greek myth to endless reverberating interpretations The Lost Books of the Odyssey is punctuated with great wit beauty and playfulness; it is a daring literary page turner that marks the emergence of an extraordinary new tale. A sort of fictional apocrypha to Homer s original Odyssey the faux introduction claims that the Lost Books come from a document that has been transcribed and handed down over time and only recently deciphered into a number of smaller books exploring different themes and variations of this storyWhat if Odysseus was a coward whose actions ultimately resulted in the defeat of both sides and he spent the next ten years disguised as a bard telling the tale that became the Odyssey that we know today What if he was a sorcerer who fashioned Achilles out of clay and gave him life by the light of a full moon What if Penelope gave up hope and killed herself and Odysseus encountered her shade in the land of the dead What if it was Odysseus who secretly married Helen and not Menelaus What if Paris was the guise worn by Death and Troy was his citadel of the dead What if the real reason Odysseus suffered so many trials on his journey home was because he d rejected the advances of AthenaAlso the writing is phenomenal A great read I can t recommend this enough

Read ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Î Zachary Mason

Zachary Mason Î 6 Download The Lost Books of The Odyssey Read ☆ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Nd his long journey home after the fall of Troy With brilliant prose terrific imagination and dazzling literary skill Mason creates alternative episodes fragments and revisions of Homer’s original that taken together open up this. The Odyssey is a nice easy to read story with the typical Greek literary virtues of lucidity and ambiguity Euripedes does it best imho but it seems to me to be almost pathologically verbose in the fight scenes there are interesting possible Reasons written about by scholars like Simone Weil why the violence is so OTT in Homer but I still have to skip pages to be able to carry on at times Ovid is even worse and rather scant when it comes to certain long periods during which all sorts of interesting things could have happened that the poet didn t care to recordIt s vaguely possible that Zachary had the same idea as me and started filling in the gaps with imagined lost books Somewhere along the line the reimagining took on counterfactual and meta aspects or perhaps it started out that way I m just reimagining it myself and became a commentary on the life of the text as well as an extension of the text and its charactersThis kind of fun is all well and good and I appreciated the clear sometimes beautiful prose but there were I guess too few moments when Mason s Lost Books touched on The Stuff I Really Care About whatever that is Probably it can be inferred from some of my other reviews for them to make much than a pleasant ripple in my attention No accounting for taste I guess I didn t like Invisible Cities either Dragon ActuallyA Tale of Two Dragons up this. The Odyssey is a nice easy to read story with the typical Greek literary virtues of lucidity and ambiguity Euripedes does it best imho but it seems to me to be almost pathologically verbose in the fight scenes there are interesting possible Reasons written about by scholars like Simone Weil why the violence is so OTT in Homer but I still have to skip pages to be able to carry on at times Ovid is even worse and rather scant when it comes to certain long periods during which all sorts of interesting things could have happened that the poet didn t care to recordIt s vaguely possible that Zachary had the same idea as me and started filling in the gaps with imagined lost books Somewhere along the line the reimagining took on counterfactual and meta aspects or perhaps it started out that way I m just reimagining it myself and became a commentary on the life of the text as well as an extension of the text and its charactersThis kind of fun is all well and good and I appreciated the clear sometimes beautiful prose but there were I guess too few moments when Mason s Lost Books touched on The Stuff I Really Care About whatever that is Probably it can be inferred from some of my other reviews for them to make much than a pleasant ripple in my attention No accounting for taste I guess I didn t like Invisible Cities either