[Tubâ va ma'nâ ye shab] E–pub ¿ شهرنوش پارسی‌پور

  • Paper back
  • 512
  • Tubâ va ma'nâ ye shab
  • شهرنوش پارسی‌پور
  • en
  • 08 March 2020
  • null

شهرنوش پارسی‌پور ☆ 3 summary

review Tubâ va ma'nâ ye shab 103 Entieth century from the era of colonialism to the rule of two shahs The Iranian best selling author of eleven books including Women Without Men Shahrnush Parsipur now lives in exile in the United State I read Touba after reading Parsipur s wonderful novella Women Without Men The novella wove the disturbing stories of five women together with the strength of a parable and I was hoping that Touba would also be in this vein The novel is steeped in Persian legend and lore but the symbolism lost its force for me in the long novel format The bold little allegories that I enjoyed in Women Without Men were sort of muddied down in service of the larger plot about a matriarch whose life story mirrors Iran s sociopolitical turmoil Perhaps my distaste for generational tales about the changing times of whatever country the story happens to be set in especially those with fantastic elements makes me judge this novel too harshly In Touba s defense cause it needs to be defended by me I think it s a stronger novel than The House of the Spirits which is the most obvious point of comparison in terms of style and plot Unlike The House of the Spirits though whose fantastic elements merely seem to be a style choice the magical realism in Touba is closely tied to the religious lives of the characters which I thought justified and strengthened the magical thread Even though neither novel is really my thing I m glad Touba has been translated into English because it serves as a rare glimpse into the very fascinating lives of Iranian women Then the Americans Came Voices from Vietnam rule of two shahs The Iranian best selling author of eleven books including Women Without Men Shahrnush Parsipur now lives in exile in the United State I Hell in a Handbasket Devilish Debutantes #2 read Touba after Say Your Abc With Me reading Parsipur s wonderful novella Women Without Men The novella wove the disturbing stories of five women together with the strength of a parable and I was hoping that Touba would also be in this vein The novel is steeped in Persian legend and lore but the symbolism lost its force for me in the long novel format The bold little allegories that I enjoyed in Women Without Men were sort of muddied down in service of the larger plot about a matriarch whose life story mirrors Iran s sociopolitical turmoil Perhaps my distaste for generational tales about the changing times of whatever country the story happens to be set in especially those with fantastic elements makes me judge this novel too harshly In Touba s defense cause it needs to be defended by me I think it s a stronger novel than The House of the Spirits which is the most obvious point of comparison in terms of style and plot Unlike The House of the Spirits though whose fantastic elements merely seem to be a style choice the magical The Outcast Dead realism in Touba is closely tied to the ಅಮ್ಮಾವ್ರ ಗಂಡ religious lives of the characters which I thought justified and strengthened the magical thread Even though neither novel is Potato Surprise A Brimstone Preuel really my thing I m glad Touba has been translated into English because it serves as a Winning The Player rare glimpse into the very fascinating lives of Iranian women

summary Tubâ va ma'nâ ye shabTubâ va ma'nâ ye shab

review Tubâ va ma'nâ ye shab 103 Ndured jail and torture and as a writer and innovator Azar Nafisi author of Reading Lolita in TehranNow available in paperback this complex epic captures the changing fortunes of Iranian women in the tw A wonderful book I really enjoyed reading it Some parts are a little harder to get through but others are suspenseful fascinating and gripping I especially liked learning about Iranian culture and history both of which I really knew nothing about before reading this book I feel like I ve broadened my horizons a little bit by understanding about what happened in Iran between the end of the 19th century and the Islamic Revolution My favorite parts of the story itself were the love story between Ismael and Moones and the magical realism that Parsipur employs a genrestyle of literature that I find especially fascinating Some of the other reviews on Goodreads mentioned the amount of characters and the complexity of the plot I found myself looking at the character list a few times but only for minor characters If you re invested in the book and really enjoy it there won t be a problem keeping up The complexity adds depth to the story and its themes For instance Ismael is an orphan the other child unwanted and neglected just like Ishmael Abraham s other son who was forced into the desert by his stepmother But he also represents pain and suffering due to the sharp class distinctions in Iran during the first part of the 20th century He is also a man in love an intellectual and a political figure This adds several layers of meaning to this one character aloneMy real complaint is this edition of the novel which is poorly edited Honestly it does a disservice to Ms Parsipur s work which is elegant and skillful and enchanting The poor proofreading makes it seem as if the publisher rushed along the printing with a disregard for the uality of the typed words to match the uality of the language itselfI recommend this book to anybody interested in Iran to fans of Parsipur s work and to people who enjoy a good story good writing and some mystical magical realism Souls in the Great Machine really enjoyed Judge Dredd Chronicles #19 reading it Some parts are a little harder to get through but others are suspenseful fascinating and gripping I especially liked learning about Iranian culture and history both of which I THE WALLPAPER CHASE really knew nothing about before SpongeBob Mix Match reading this book I feel like I ve broadened my horizons a little bit by understanding about what happened in Iran between the end of the 19th century and the Islamic Revolution My favorite parts of the story itself were the love story between Ismael and Moones and the magical Rules of the Knife Fight realism that Parsipur employs a genrestyle of literature that I find especially fascinating Some of the other Know What I Saw? reviews on Goodreads mentioned the amount of characters and the complexity of the plot I found myself looking at the character list a few times but only for minor characters If you The Goodbye Girl Vocal Selections re invested in the book and Gunnin' For Love really enjoy it there won t be a problem keeping up The complexity adds depth to the story and its themes For instance Ismael is an orphan the other child unwanted and neglected just like Ishmael Abraham s other son who was forced into the desert by his stepmother But he also MIA Hunter represents pain and suffering due to the sharp class distinctions in Iran during the first part of the 20th century He is also a man in love an intellectual and a political figure This adds several layers of meaning to this one character aloneMy Overlords of Atlantis and the Great Pyramid real complaint is this edition of the novel which is poorly edited Honestly it does a disservice to Ms Parsipur s work which is elegant and skillful and enchanting The poor proofreading makes it seem as if the publisher Magic and Mayhem rushed along the printing with a disregard for the uality of the typed words to match the uality of the language itselfI Good bye recommend this book to anybody interested in Iran to fans of Parsipur s work and to people who enjoy a good story good writing and some mystical magical The Black Seminoles History of a Freedom Seeking People realism

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review Tubâ va ma'nâ ye shab 103 With this bold insightful novel Parsipur makes a stylishly original contribution to modern feminist literature Publishers Weekly starred reviewParsipur should be admired both as a courageous woman who e As the events this past month unfolded our aggregated American heads swiveled towards Iran looking at it with greater interest than since the 1980s Who is this Iran center of the Axis of evil run by a midget Holocaust denier and populated with beautiful and politically engaged students Iran s history seems like it has been a long tug between its rich cultural Persian history and religious fundamentalism with some US puppet governments thrown in for good measure I m not sure why but I ve always been an Iranophile I have been deeply impressed by all Persians I ve met and find the mystical and artistic traditions lovely This even allowed me to benignly ignore the completely ridiculous assertions of Ahmadinejad and even so enjoy the SNL musical spoof of him And so for a long time I d been looking to read an Iranian woman author So when I saw Touba and the Meaning of Night on a pile at a friend s house I picked it up and started reading Great political changes happen during the long life of the title character Touba Her life extends from the turn of the last century till probably the 1960s and throughout the novel she is vaguely aware of political change but never of it The almost total separation of the woman s realm from the men s is extremely hard especially as a 21st century western woman reader to fathom and yet I assume that Touba is a novelistic rendering of a pretty accurate and commonplace experience And as she grows older and Iran undergoes total political and social change all of which tug on Touba s life in mostly upsetting ways she only is able to perceive the world as a vaguely upsetting shadow as if the character from Plato s cave was a veiled woman Unlike Magical Realism the fantastical or escapist aspects of the novel are not a way for the writer to create a slanted critiue of their countries corrupt politics the back of the novel unhelpfully compares it to works by Maruez and Allende In Touba her escape into mystical experiences is just an aspect of this character s psychological profile and for whom as the reader may experience are a salve for her relentlessly pessimistic life and attitude She is a woman locked out of or into depending how you look at it her expected social roles Even in the restricted society of her time the expectations of women s roles oscillate One regime outlaws the Bura the next reinstates it And being poorly informed and uneducated everything just seems like an arbitrary and frustrating attack on her personal realm Though Touba unlike other women of her generation was taught to read and this makes her exceptional It also allows her just enough of a glimpse into the forbidden realm of politics to make her confused For example when her husband explains the Bolsheviks by saying they want to divide everything even women Touba misunderstands and thinks the Bolsheviks want to literary break women in half The novel also dips in and out in an almost Austenian manner of the lives and minds of other characters in her sphere from the uncle who tears the fetus out of his raped teenage daughter s womb to the viciously angry young reactionary who threatens to burn Touba s home It s all very depressing This is not the novel to read if one is looking for happy endings or happy beginnings or in betweens even The characters are not just trapped by their natures as should be any worthy literary characters but by an ossification of the roles society demands of them All the misery seems so worthless Touba never suffers from poverty violence abandonment on any great scale and yet the subtleties of her suffering and her escape into religious observance are almost caustic But it is in direct proportion to how uncomfortable this novel made me that I strongly recommend it