EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre]


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  1. says: Free read Zur Farbenlehre Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre]

    EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Most self respecting books about colour mention Goethe sooner or later Those references are simply the continued reverberations of his work from when it was written in 1810 to the present day and they retroactively provide the unin

  2. says: review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre]

    EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] Only book on color you'll ever need

  3. says: EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre]

    review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] Goethe plays a game of marbles with his eyeballs You can join him but you have to play by his rules; and they won't always be fair I wasn't ab

  4. says: Free read Zur Farbenlehre review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review

    Free read Zur Farbenlehre Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe My favorite chapter was brown

  5. says: Free read Zur Farbenlehre review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review

    EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] of introduction In looking a little further round us we are not without fears that we may fail to satisfy anoth

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    EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] recommended by a bearded and bespectacled youth with a studious aspect on the sf muni or was it boston? I think it was sf

  7. says: Free read Zur Farbenlehre Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] Still reeling I have no idea how to rate this thing or even to describe it other than as an unintentional bizarre comedy

  8. says: EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] Free read Zur Farbenlehre You what?

  9. says: EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre]

    review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review The contradistinction between science and phenomenology is most clear when you realize that phenomenology attempts no deconstruction through intentional being of the physical self vis a vis to perception And that is essentially what happens with formal idealism in general The fundamental classification of Goethe in this proselytizing enterpr

  10. says: EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review

    EBOOK / PDF [Zur Farbenlehre] review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review Finishing Goethe's treatise on colours such obssessive descriptions of prismastic experiments makes me imagine Goethe as a Locus Solus case Very educative on colour theory and composition also discovered that the sky is a great prismatic colour wheel turning every day above our heads I found on youtube these fi

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  • Paperback
  • 468
  • Zur Farbenlehre
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • English
  • 21 May 2018
  • 9780262570213

Free read Zur Farbenlehre

review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review review Zur Farbenlehre é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free S to the circumstances under which they appear and are and beyond which no further explanation respecting them is possibleGoethe's scientific conclusions have of course long since been thoroughly demolished but the intelligent reader of today may enjoy this work on uite different grounds for the beauty and sweep of his conjectures regarding the connection between color and philosophical ideas; for an insight into early nineteenth century beliefs and modes of thought; and for the flavor of life in Europe just after the American and French RevolutionsThe work may also be read as an accurate guide. of introduction In looking a little further round us we are not without fears that we may fail to satisfy another class of scientific men By an extraordinary combination of circumstances the theory of colours has been drawn into the province and before the tribunal of the mathematician a tribunal to which it cannot be said to be amenable This was owing to its affinity with the other laws of vision which the mathematician was legitimately called upon to treat It was owing again to another circumstance a great mathematician had investigated the theory of colours and having been mistaken in his observations as an experimentalist he employed the whole force of his talent to give consistency to this mistake Were both these circumstances considered all misunderstanding would presently be removed and the mathematician would willingly cooperate with us especially in the physical department of the theoryTo the practical man to the dyer on the other hand our labour must be altogether acceptable for it was precisely those who reflected on the facts resulting from the operations of dyeing who were the least satisfied with the old theory they were the first who perceived the insufficiency of the Newtonian doctrine The conclusions of men are very different according to the mode in which they approach a science or branch of knowledge from which side through which door they enter The literally practical man the manufacturer whose attention is constantly and forcibly called to the facts which occur under his eye who experiences benefit or detriment from the application of his convictions to whom loss of time and money is not indifferent who is desirous of advancing who aims at eualling or surpassing what others have accomplished such a person feels the unsoundness and erroneousness of a theory much sooner than the man of letters in whose eyes words consecrated by authority are at last euivalent to solid coin than the mathematician whose formula always remains infallible even although the foundation on which it is constructed may not suare with it Again to carry on the figure before employed in entering this theory from the side of painting from the side of aesthetic colouring generally we shall befound to have accomplished a most thankworthy office for the artist In the sixth part we have endeavoured to define the effects of colour as addressed at once to the eye and mind with a view to making them available for the purposes of art Although much in this portion and indeed throughout has been suffered to remain as a sketch it should be remembered that all theory can in strictness only point out leading principles under the guidance of which practice may proceed with vigour and be enabled to attain legitimate results stetic Belonging to taste as mere internal sense from Ancient Greek to feel the word was first used by Wolf T

review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von GoetheZur Farbenlehre

review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review review Zur Farbenlehre é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free By the time Goethe's Theory of Colours appeared in 1810 the wavelength theory of light and color had been firmly established To Goethe the theory was the result of mistaking an incidental result for an elemental principle Far from pretending to a knowledge of physics he insisted that such knowledge was an actual hindrance to understanding He based his conclusions exclusively upon exhaustive personal observation of the phenomena of colorOf his own theory Goethe was supremely confident From the philosopher we believe we merit thanks for having traced the phenomena of colours to their first source. Most self respecting books about colour mention Goethe sooner or later Those references are simply the continued reverberations of his work from when it was written in 1810 to the present day and they retroactively provide the uninitiated reader with a context for his theory and the motivation to peruse it Otherwise facing 920 textual units that make up Goethe s Theory of Colours could prove uite dauntingIf you wish garner some of that context and motivation here are a few references I came across most recently1912 In Concerning the Spiritual in Art Wassily Kandinsky begins his section on The Language of Form and Colour with two uotations by Shakespeare and Delacroix but then grounds them using Goethe s theoryThese two uotations show the deep relationship between the arts and especially between music and painting Goethe said that painting must count this relationship her main foundation and by this prophetic remark he seems to foretell the position in which painting is today1975 In On Being Blue William H Gass gives his lyrical interpretation of Goethe s theory of lightEye and sky together are then blue and its apprehension Goethe great pagan that he was sounds the same note The eye owes its very existence to light From inert animal ancillary organs light evokes an organ which shall become light and so the eye learns to give light for light emitting an internal ray to encounter that from without1977 In Remarks on Colours Ludwig Wittegenstein uses Goethe s theory as a springboard for his own dissenting ideasOne thing was irrefutably clear to Goethe no lightness can come out of darkness just as and shadows do not produce light This could be expressed as follows we may call lilac a reddish whitish blue or brown a blackish reddish yellow but we cannot call a white a yellowish reddish greenish blue or the like And that is something that experiments with the spectrum neither confirm nor refute It would however also be wrong to say Just look at the colours in nature and you will see that it is so For looking does not teach us anything about the concepts of colours2009 In Bluets Maggie Nelson cites Goethe in favour of her topic We love to contemplate blue not because it advances to us but because it draws us after it wrote Goethe and perhaps he is right2017 In The Secret Lives of Colours Kasia St Claire gives Goethe s somewhat unfortunate uote in large magenta letters across a black backgroundSavage nations uneducated people and children have a great predilection for vivid coloursLet that suffice as a first offering of reverberationsAt the time of publication Goethe s theory was contentious to say the least He spent a whole part examining the Newtonian theory of colour from a negative standpoint Specifically in the preface Goethe saysIn the second part we examine the Newtonian theory a theory which by its ascendancy and consideration has hitherto impeded a free inuiry into the phenomena of colours We combat that hypothesis for although it is no longer found available it still retains a traditional authority in the worldBut this Gutenberg edition with notes by Charles Lock Eastlake does not cover that part Instead it focuses on colour theory a substantial portion which is itself divided into six partsPart I Physiological coloursPart II Physical coloursPart III Chemical coloursPart IV General characteristicsPart V Relation to other pursuitsPart VI Effect of colour with reference to moral associationsEach of the parts is further divided into numbered units of thought that actually aid the reader it s easier to focus only on the interesting ideasAnd interesting ideas abound I d roughly divide them into Pure observationsoften used in illusions 38 A grey object on a black ground appears much brighter than the same object on a white groundminutiae 378 In mother of pearl we perceive infinitely fine organic fibres and lamell in juxta position from which as from the scratched silver before alluded to varied colours but especially red and green may arise Observations during experiments65 Let a short lighted candle be placed at twilight on a sheet of white paper Between it and the declining daylight let a pencil be placed upright so that its shadow thrown by the candle may be lighted but not overcome by the weak daylight the shadow will appear of the most beautiful blue476 If we hold a penknife in the flame of a light a coloured stripe will appear across the blade The portion of the stripe which was nearest to the flame is light blue this melts into blue red the red is in the centre then follow yellow red and yellow Anecdotesabout the negative afterimage of bright objects that have overstimulated the rods and cones 52 I had entered an inn towards evening and as a well favoured girl with a brilliantly fair complexion black hair and a scarlet bodice came into the room I looked attentively at her as she stood before me at some distance in half shadow As she presently afterwards turned away I saw on the white wall which was now before me a black face surrounded with a bright light while the dress of the perfectly distinct figure appeared of a beautiful sea green Classifications140 Light under these circumstances may be affected by three conditions First when it flashes back from the surface of a medium in considering which catoptrical experiments invite our attention Secondly when it passes by the edge of a medium the phenomena thus produced were formerly called perioptical we prefer the term paroptical Thirdly when it passes through either a merely light transmitting or an actually transparent body thus constituting a class of appearances on which dioptrical experiments are founded We have called a fourth class of physical colours epoptical as the phenomena exhibit themselves on the colourless surface of bodies under various conditions without previous or actual dye Simplifications to contrastsPlus MinusYellow BlueAction NegationLight ShadowBrightness DarknessForce WeaknessWarmth ColdnessProximity DistanceRepulsion AttractionAffinity with acids Affinity with alkalis Dated but historically relevant generalisations840 The female sex in youth is attached to rose colour and sea green in age to violet and dark green The fair haired prefer violet as opposed to light yellow the brunettes blue as opposed to yellow red and all on good grounds The Roman emperors were extremely jealous with regard to their purple The robe of the Chinese Emperor is orange embroidered with red his attendants and the ministers of religion wear citron yellowNaturally it s also a pleasure to hunt down the sources for the references found in other books For example whilst Kandinsky mentions Goethe only that once as far as I could tell I found far similarities in their strains of thought so much so that I feel credit should have been given to Goethe s observations of colour expansions and contractions colour passivity and activity and the connection of colour to sound748 Colour and sound do not admit of being directly compared together in any way but both are referable to a higher formula both are derivable although each for itself from this higher law They are like two rivers which have their source in one and the same mountain but subseuently pursue their way under totally different conditions in two totally different regions so that throughout the whole course of both no two points can be compared Both are general elementary effects acting according to the general law of separation and tendency to union of undulation and oscillation yet acting thus in wholly different provinces in different modes on different elementary mediums for different sensesAnd there is so much The book is a deep branching compendium of observations and opinion which is why writers artists and philosophers return to Goethe s Theory Refusing to read it would be like insisting on reinventing all the different colour wheels when you could instead be studying their properties

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review

review í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ö Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Ö 5 review review Zur Farbenlehre é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free To the study of color phenomena Goethe's conclusions have been repudiated but no one uarrels with his reporting of the facts to be observed With simple objects vessels prisms lenses and the like the reader will be led through a demonstration course not only in subjectively produced colors but also in the observable physical phenomena of color By closely following Goethe's explanations of the color phenomena the reader may become so divorced from the wavelength theory Goethe never even mentions it that he may begin to think about color theory relatively unhampered by prejudice ancient or modern. The contradistinction between science and phenomenology is most clear when you realize that phenomenology attempts no deconstruction through intentional being of the physical self vis a vis to perception And that is essentially what happens with formal idealism in general The fundamental classification of Goethe in this proselytizing enterpriseWhile Goethe acknowledges fundamentally the purely perceptual nature of color and thus attempts to understand what effects the perception of the colorality or the status of something possessing color in effect if speaking in relation to its perceptionTo Goethe color is a purely ideal or absolutely substantive aesthetic construct which would mean that its existence is purely sensational and this irreducible And when such perceptions are dealt with it enters the domain of psychology which is probably why Wittegenstein said that that is what Goethe was trying to achieve As a basic example Goethe considers black not as a lack of light but defined it as its polar opposite and no he did not deconstruct it per seThere is a break in the chain of causality between the perception of color as it is perceived phenomenologically and the things which Goethe elaborates as conditions for its modalities of being which is largely what the text is an exploration of The first three chapters Physiological Colors Physical Colors and Chemical colors is concerned with this There are experiments and then very general classificationsSection 4 goes through some associated abstractions of the phenomenology of color 5 is its extension to different fields of knowledge or perspectives which have a definitive and not a superficial relation to color These are rather short sectionsSection 6 is another long section on the association of colors with moralizations or some kind of axiologyIt s a fundamentally different epistemological methodology than the Newtonian outlook the scientific outlook absolutely fundamentally for its presuppositions seem to exclude formalizability which makes sense but is worth a read regardless of perhaps its lack of practical utilityNote this is a very general review so spoiler notif is not on